How to Fix a Hole in Your Jeans

Posted on May 31, 2011 by admin | 37 Comments

Last week, I clumsily fell + ripped a hole in my favorite pair of jeans. I've patched jeans before with iron on patches, which work great. For this hole + for my favorite jeans, I wanted a patch that was a little less noticeable.  

I started by ironing the tear. I ironed all of the threads towards the rip.

I then took a small embroidery hoop + stretched the area taught.

Here is a (very poor) illustration of the basic idea of what I did.  I started by stitching vertically across the whole tear. Then I horizontally, I weaved in + out of the vertical stitches.

I repeated this about three times, until I was satisfied with the strength of the patch.

It's true, you can defiantly see the patch, but luckily this area is right under my knee + is less noticeable. I've since worn these jeans + even washed them + the patch held just fine.

How do you patch your jeans?

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25 Responses

crazysquid
crazysquid

April 10, 2014

My son had bought a pair of very expensive jeans and put them in the laundry. After I had done the laundry, I noticed that his new pants had some holes in them. Thinking that he would be upset because the jeans had holes in them after only one wash, I remembered your way of repairing holes in jeans. I worked on them for two hours, mending each hole carefully trying to seal the holes as best as possible. After I had finished the jeans, I placed them in his room. When he arrived home, he went to his room and yelled “why did you sew the holes in my jeans my jeans?!” Two hours sewing holes in those jeans, and I found out that he purchased the jeans, with the holes already in them, for $65.00. At least it was easy undoing the patches.

Pat Diamond
Pat Diamond

September 23, 2013

I have done this type of patch for over 40 years. The only difference is that I use variegated embroidery thread. If the material is old and thin take your sewing machine and zig-zag over the tear after ironing then do your patch.

Crystal
Crystal

September 23, 2013

I had a thinning spot that had not yet become a hole so I un-stitched the leg seam, fused lightweight stabilizer to the inside and then free motioned a flower over the whole area with my sewing machine. I used denim-colored thread and you can’t even see the repair – which is really too bad beings it’s so cute!

Bonnie
Bonnie

September 22, 2013

I always reinforce the inside with an iron-on patch to make it stronger.

Connie
Connie

September 22, 2013

When this happens, as it often does as I do mending for folks, I simply turn the jean leg wrong side out, take out the inner leg seam which then allows you to place the pant leg flat under your pressure foot of your sewing machine… I work from the right side of the fabric, inserting a small piece of denim material on the backside of the pant leg and using the zigzag stitch, I simply go back and forth on the hole, ending up with the same result… Then I simply turn the pant leg inside out and stitch up the inner leg seam….

islander
islander

September 22, 2013

“you can defiantly see the patch” Really? You’re defiant?

Back in the day when socks were mended rather than thrown away, this is how they were darned. If you lack a darning egg, substitute a light bulb.

charlene
charlene

September 22, 2013

The “old fashioned” way was to cut a diagonal slit (about an inch) off of the four corners of the rip or hole. Go to the inside of the jean. Iron the four “flaps” you have created by cutting the slits (it reminds me of an envelope) away from the original hole or rip. Then cut a fresh piece of denim in a square shape or rectangle depending on the size of the original hole and its shape. You machine sew the new piece of denim onto the flaps you cut as close to the fold of the flaps as you can. Trim the square to lessen the seam. Bring jeans back to the outside and discover you have a nice new piece of denim where the hole was originally. You can iron to get as flat as you can but that is a true way to patch without an iron on.

Doris Young
Doris Young

September 22, 2013

Darning is great for a lot of different fabrics. My problem is that I don’t throw away old or torn jeans. I cut them up and make wonderful projects or use it in quilted designs.

Somya
Somya

November 24, 2013

all my jeans have recently started getting torn…all at the same place.. below my ass .. somewhere between my legs… though I gained weight recently( 5-6 kg) so I got new pairs(larger size ) and they all too got torn… within 3 months … I m worried… I can’t spend 1000 dollars every month just on jeans… can u help ?

Sandy
Sandy

September 22, 2013

I have done the exact same thing and the same method using a sewing machine.

Josie
Josie

September 22, 2013

Just a quickuestion though, does this work for the stretchy jeans you find all over the place these days? Because I have found that they just come apart more when trying to patch or just sew the hole. I do love the idea of this however. I have a few pair of pants I’ve been putting off patching because I wasn’t sure my own method would work.

Lynda
Lynda

September 10, 2013

In our disposable/throw away society, a few basic sewing skills can be a real money saver.

sandy
sandy

September 22, 2013

I patch jeans using almost the same method but with a zigzag stitch on my sewing machine. I buy the demin thread at Hancocks or similar store that blends in with the color of jeans I am repairing.

William Turner
William Turner

July 05, 2011

I don't like this type of style, your post is very nice…


thanks to share
William Turner
Leather Pants

Trina
Trina

October 06, 2012

Brilliant! Thank you so very much for posting this. I was beginning to loose hope after searching for a week and only finding the typical iron-on-patch tutorials. I KNEW there had to be a better solution! Going to try it right now. Your pictures are perfect, too. Thank you!!!

Susan
Susan

October 08, 2012

yeah! so glad that it helped.

Tif
Tif

June 08, 2011

Thank you so much for posting this. My 7 year old son wears out the knees in his jeans days after I buy them, and now I am going to handle that problem!! Gotta buy me a hoop!!! I've gotta link this great post to my blog!! My friends have to see this!
http://throughmylensetlh.blogspot.com

Nomadic D.
Nomadic D.

June 26, 2011

Are you kidding me?! You DARNED your jeans?! I am madly impressed. And yes, mildly tempted to do it myself too. When I get holes in my jeans I either embrace them or throw the jeans away, depending on placement of said hole. This kind of blew my mind! Love your blog!

http://nomadic-d.blogspot.com/

Rach H
Rach H

June 03, 2011

I'm glad I found this post, my neighbor dropped off a pair of jeans he wants patched, and i've been putting it off because I have no idea how! Thank you!!!

UK lass in US
UK lass in US

June 04, 2011

I did pretty much the same thing a week ago, although I didn't use an embroidery hoop. I just went back and forth every which way using the sewing machine and off-white thread, which surprisingly blends in well (well, the jeans already had a bit of sun bleaching anyway).

I'm still traumatised that my favourite pair of jeans seems to be on the verge of falling apart when there is nothing in the stores to replace them. I'm wearing bell-bottoms right now, as that was the best I could find. I'm feeling far too self-conscious in them, though.

Cara
Cara

June 06, 2011

Thanks for posting this, I wouldn't have thought to use an embroidery hoop!

Athena
Athena

June 02, 2011

The thing that I find the most amusing about this fix it job is that I have bought my daughter brand new pants that have this technique done all over them, they don't have holes but the look of the slightly fixed look. The only difference that I noticed the manufacturer does is that they reinforce the back with interfacing. Now I don't have to buy her new jeans with this look I can just fix up her old ones and perhaps add more holes. Just a quick question do you use regular thread or was it embroider thread? Or heavy duty?

Floor
Floor

June 02, 2011

I'm incredibly lazy, so i iron a piece of vliesofix (the dutch name, doublesided fusible interfacing in english?) to a piece of canvas, cut it a bit bigger than the rip, and iron to the inside of the pants. 5min max.

Injoytroye
Injoytroye

June 02, 2011

This is EXACTLY what designer denim store do when they repair a $200 pair of jeans!!! Way to go! And the other commenter is right. I have paid over $100 for a pair of jeans that have these exact "repairs" in them!!!!

Lori
Lori

June 01, 2011

OH WOW! Thank you! My all time favorite jeans ripped at the knee today. I guess they had just had enough. I'm going to try this so I can wear them until something more critical gives out (i.e. the butt).

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